(Abstract Only) The Pond Separates Cultures but Not Values: A Comparative Look at the French Codification of Right to Withdrawal of Labor and the American Concept of At-Will Employment

I’ve just sent off my recent scholarship of comparative law to several journals for review and publishing. You can download a copy of the abstract and table of contents here: https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3843388.


Update: I was offered and signed my first ever publishing agreement for scholarship with the University of Florida. I was fortunate to have been offered publication in some notable journals. The Florida Journal of International Law felt like the best fit for this piece. Gainesville holds a special place in our Gator family.


Abstract: The differences and similarities of the United States common law concept of “right to work” and the modern development in France of the right to withdraw labor, after the “yellow vest” movement in 2018, demonstrate a parallel diminution of workers’ rights. These changes are motivated by the same values inherent within capitalism that are superimposed through the law. This article analyzes the social and legal context in both countries that demonstrate that the superimposition of these values through law is a continuing modern western trend. The key difference is that while the French model is designed to decrease the pressure for strike actions by workers, it also serves as a protection to workers as compared with the American model which exists as a tool to remove workplace protections by substantially altering the terms and conditions of employment. Further, this article demonstrates that these concepts are both divergent and convergent in terms of core shared values and the peripheral aspect of laws setting cultural norms. This article then concludes through comparative analysis that while the French right to withdraw labor is a product of legislative supremacy, and the American view within the common law is that at-will employment is the standard, the French model is a product of generations of social negotiations. The American model is a product of the easily swayed influences within the common law that allow a new legal theory with little to no precedential value at the time of its proposal to be adopted in sweeping fashion with very little civil discourse.

Cite as: Wazlavek, Thomas D. Aaron, The Pond Separates Cultures but Not Values: A Comparative Look at the French Codification of Right to Withdrawal of Labor and the American Concept of At-Will Employment. 33 Fla. J. Int’l L __ (forthcoming 2021), Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=3843388.